North Shore Dads develop Trainerly Offering Last Minute Online Fitness Deal without Membership

Edan Gelt

Northbrook, IL – Russ Berkun and Leo Akselrud, local dads and residents of Glenview and Northbrook, developed Trainerly (www.trainer.ly) – an online fitness platform to deliver last minute deals for classes at local fitness studios. Users of Trainerly can log on the night before or on their way home from work to find an available class deal near them without committing to a membership at a studio or gym. Unlike popular fitness site ClassPass, no membership is required for Trainerly, classes are available based on need, location, and budget.

Trainerly founders Berkun and Akselrud decided to launch the platform after finding it frustrating to make scheduled class times. Whether they were stuck in traffic, in between meetings, racing home after work or driving kids around town, the partners said they often missed scheduled class times at their local studios and wished there was an app that would offer a fitness class near where they were at.

Trainerly is primarily a listing service for fitness classes – similar to Expedia for airfare or Hotels.com for accommodations. Requiring no monthly membership, Trainerly is designed as a pay-as-you-go platform. Trainerly is great for individuals who have unpredictable schedules, not sure of the type of fitness program they want to belong to long term, or not ready for a commitment.

Edan Gelt

The program was designed as a win-win for the studios, Trainerly, and the users. The fitness studios set their own discounted pricing, Trainerly offers an array of classes on its website for a small percentage of sales and users can choose a class that fits their needs without any long-standing commitment. Currently, there are 40 studios on the Trainerly platform, from boot camp to yoga and boxing to pole dancing. Trainerly expects to sign on more than 100 studios by the end of 2017.

The studio owners like Trainerly because their class prices aren’t devalued like Groupon or ClassPass. Since studios set their own pricing, they can change it based on demand. If the class is more popular, the fee will be higher than a class that has more than 5 spots left.

“There is nothing like it in the Chicago market”, said founding partner, Leo Akselrud. “Sure, there’s ClassPass but you have to pay a monthly membership to try their classes. At Trainerly, you only pay for the classes you use. Some studios offer classes as low as $5”.

The founders worked with local fitness blogger and marketing strategist, Edan Gelt, at Joy of Fitness – www.edanjoygelt.com to help identify the needs of local studios and gyms before launching. “We learned that studios wanted qualified leads and were concerned about devaluing their classes and offending current members. We addressed that in our location and pricing structure when building the platform”, said founding partner Russ Berkun. “We custom created a program to cater to the end users but also benefit the gyms or studios by delivering qualified and valuable leads”, he said.

Subscribe to Trainerly at www.trainer.ly or at Trainerly on Facebook for last-minute classes up to 50% off. Gyms and studios can find out more information about joining Trainerly in the Chicago market by visiting their website or by emailing founder Leo Akselrud at leo@trainer.ly

Sourcehttps://patch.com/illinois/glenview/north-shore-dads-develop-trainerly-online-platform-offering-last-minute-fitness

https://www.dailyherald.com/submitted/20170514/-north-shore-dads-develop-trainerly-an-online-platform-offering-last-minute-fitness-deals—-no-membership-required

“You Are Fat” & Bad Messaging

Before starting my fitness blog (www.edanjoygelt.com) – I was working with a MedSpa on a marketing project. I was hired to drive sales for non-invasive body contouring (I know, totally anti-fitness).

In addition to digital marketing, we decided an oversized postcard to the target market would be the most direct way to get this message out. The owner really wanted the message to be prominent – something to capture attention about lipo-type services the MedSpa offered. She said “Edan, I want you to make the headline “You are Fat” or “Are you Fat?”. I couldn’t.

I had to educate my client about messaging, marketing and branding. It was actually challenging to overcome her insistence of such a crass headline. She wanted something bold, something to capture attention (which bad messaging did) but not in the way it needed to. I was challenged – I could never put my name on such an advertisement.

Edan Gelt

First, fat people don’t really believe or even know they are fat. Second, if they were really “FAT”, non-invasive body contouring probably isn’t the answer. Lastly, I don’t body shame – ever!.

I needed to come up with a clever way to sell body services without being rude, but at the same time, not boring. The campaign wound up being “Hangover?” It fit perfectly since it was over the holidays, a lot of people were likely a bit hungover and were feeling a bit “bloated”.

To further drive home the message of health in the campaign (which I couldn’t help but include), I suggested the client partner with a local gym to offer a 3-month membership with any body-contouring procedure over $1,000. The campaign landed as a win-win, it was well accepted by the client base, generated new leads for the gym and resulted in double-digit increase for body contouring.

What I really liked about the campaign is that by partnering with the gym, It positioned the MedSpa as a facility that cared about the long term health of the client.

The Social Experiment -Social Media 101

Two weeks ago, I tried a social experiment.  I attempted to brand myself as a fitness expert.  I’m 40 years old (maybe 41 but who’s counting), I can’t run worth anything and I would not be considered athletic by any stretch of the imagination.  Regardless, I wanted to try my hand at building a brand and using only organic ways to do it.

Edan Gelt

In the corporate world, I was never truly trained in social media.  I mean, I went to social media conferences, I attended a certification class at U of I  (I’m certified in digital marketing) and read countless articles on the importance of brand building in the social environment.

When I went off on my own, I sold social media as a skill but did I really know what I was doing?  I kept up on the social changes but honestly, I didn’t have a clue.  I posted on FB daily like any social gal should do but my impressions sucked.  Even when I linked the social content across multiple platforms.  I would have 500 followers on a page and get like 30 impressions – blah.

Thankfully I had a friend who spent countless hours with me showing me the importance of linking, building unique content, introducing me to new platforms and convincing me to lose all inhibition and go “all out” – (which later included publicly pole dancing but you can only find that on my social platforms – take a peak).

I set up a Tumblr blog on edanjoygelt.com and began visiting studios and writing opinions on each visit.  Because the content was unique, it was already a win.  But once it was posted on Tumblr – then what?  It was going nowhere unless someone knew it existed.

I then curated the content through Scoop.it to social platforms I had set up, which gave me a little more power but still, nothing to write home about.

The biggest key was Facebook – I started a Joy of Fitness page https://www.facebook.com/edanjoyfitness/, then I tagged everything with my name #fitnessmom #joyoffitness and then also with my name Edan Gelt and Edan Joy Gelt (so it would share across my personal content as well).

I invited everyone I knew, I added friends and asked them to do the same.  This exercise landed me 200+ followers.  Pressure was on!

I started a twitter page, a google plus page and more and began curating my original content on tumblr, sweeping it up through scoop.it to and sharing it across the platforms.  I’m still struggling with tagging on scoop.it so I some times just post direct for my own unique content.

The fitness locations I would write about would also share my facebook page posts – and why wouldn’t they, it promotes the studios too.  The result – the Facebok fitness posts and reviews would sometimes get up to 1700 views!  But wait – I only had 200 followers, how could this be?

This is how organic social works.  The content was unique, the sharing told FB it was interesting and the engagement confirmed it with some sort of top secret FB algorithm.  This shows up organically in people’s feed without paying for ads.

I’m still learning and I’m only on my 11th post but I thought I would share my first ever social experiment.  Stay tuned for more!

By:  Edan Gelt CMD MBA

Originally posted on http://edangelt.com/post/157502587301/social-media-training-101